Hip, Hip, Hooray | F*ck the Patriarchy

 Credit: Katherine Hanlon

Credit: Katherine Hanlon

Hip, Hip, Hooray

After Hurricane Maria and its widespread power and water outages, many women in Puerto Rico are embracing their natural, curly hair. Typically, many women went to great lengths to straighten their hair with harsh chemicals and hair dryers because of a pervasive view that straight hair made them more put together, but that view is starting the change. 
 

Saudi Arabia issued the country's first female drivers’ licenses to a group of ten women last week. The move comes three weeks before the kingdom is set to lift its ban on women driving,


Stacey Cunningham recently succeeded Thomas Farley to become the New York Stock Exchange's 67th president, making her the first female president in its 226 year history. "We still struggle to get a lot of women into finance, and while we have a lot of senior women in our organization, we still struggle to get the equal ratio of women into finance generally," Cunningham said recently.

 

F*ck the Patriarchy

Both Sandra Bullock and Cate Blanchett recently shared they both nearly left the entertainment industry because of pervasive sexism. Said Blanchett, "I don't think about my gender until those opportunities are not available to me or denied to me because of my gender...You know what the poster’s going to look like, and you’re not being paid the same as the person you’ve got equal billing and screen time with, and you think, ‘Actually, that’s not right.’”  


During the 2017-18 season, Women in Football, a British equality group, saw a 400% rise in the number of reports of sex discrimination and harassment incidents received. Overall, 271 incidents were reported, including lewd sexual comments, racist, gendered remarks and threats of violence toward high‑profile female journalists, broadcasters, players and referees. 


Marian Keyes, a best-selling Irish author, has accused the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize of sexism after never even shortlisting one of her books. The leading comic fiction prize has only had 3 female winners in the past 18 years, and its judging panel is dominated by men. Keyes said men have won the prize almost every year "Because they're men. Because male voices are automatically given extra weight. I mean, anything that's ever been said or done by a woman just matters less."